The Greenwich Skating Club in Greenwich, Connecticut

Greenwich Skating Club pic
Greenwich Skating Club
Image: greenwichskatingclub.org

Henry R. Minchin Jr. (Hank) of Greenwich, CT is the managing director of Credit Suisse in New York, New York, and also serves on the Credit Suisse US Equity Operating Committee. Outside of the office, Hank Minchin enjoys hockey and belongs to the Greenwich Skating Club.

The Greenwich Skating Club is a popular local ice rink and athletic center. The club is home to the only outdoor ice rink in Greenwich, giving members a welcome chance at outdoor fun during the cold winter months.

Due to its size and popularity, the Greenwich Skating Club only offers memberships to 250 families at a time. People who wish to join must find a current member to sponsor them and then wait for an opening.

Members have access to figure skating and hockey lessons at every level. Young figure skaters can master the basics in groups or in private lessons, while advanced students learn to perform jumps, spins, and other sophisticated maneuvers. Adult programs are available as well for both beginning and intermediate skaters.

The Club also offers youth hockey teams for players of all ability and commitment level. Travel leagues are an option for players who wish to compete in tournaments outside the city, while the outdoor hockey league is open to those who seek weekend play right at home in Greenwich.

An Overview of Tennis’ Federer-Nadal Rivalry

 Federer-Nadal Rivalry  pic
Federer-Nadal Rivalry
Image: tennisnow.com

Based out of Greenwich, CT, Henry R. Minchin, Jr., who prefers the nickname Hank, is managing director of Credit Suisse in New York City. Hank Minchin enjoys staying physically active when he is not working, playing sports such as tennis in his hometown of Greenwich, CT.

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, two of the most accomplished tennis players in the history of the sport, have spent more than a decade engaging in what many consider to be the greatest rivalry tennis has ever seen. Despite Nadal leading the head-to-head by a comfortable 23-11 margin, the two have contested several highly competitive matches while becoming the first pair of men to finish as the world’s top two players for six consecutive years.

Federer and Nadal competed against one another for the first time in 2004 at the Miami Masters event. At 17 years of age, the unseeded Nadal shocked the tennis world by beating the world No. 1 in straight sets. One year later, the two met in the final of the same tournament. This time Federer overcame a two-set deficit to win in five sets, evening their head-to-head at one match apiece. Just a few months later Nadal defeated Federer in their first grand slam encounter, a semifinal victory that led to the first of Nadal’s nine trophies at Roland Garros.

Since 2005, Federer and Nadal have met at 10 additional grand slam tournaments. Nadal defeated Federer in the finals of the French Open from 2006-2008, and for a fifth time in 2011. Federer has won two of the three matches to take place at the finals of Wimbledon. Nadal’s 2008 Wimbledon victory, however, is often regarded as one of the greatest matches in tennis history. Nadal has won all three meetings between the two at the Australian Open, including the 2009 final. The two have never met at the US Open. In total, Nadal leads 13-2 on clay and 9-7 on hard courts, while Federer maintains a 2-1 advantage on grass.

The Longest Tennis Match Ever Played

Hank Minchin of Greenwich, CT, serves as a managing director at Credit Suisse in New York City. When he is not spending time with his children in Greenwich, CT, Hank Minchin enjoys attending sporting events and staying in shape by skiing and playing tennis.

The longest match in tennis history began on Tuesday, June 22, 2010, during the second day of play at the 2010 Wimbledon Championships. The first-round match was contested by Nicolas Mahut of France, who had played three lengthy qualifying matches simply to gain entry to the main draw, and American John Isner. Play began early Tuesday evening and ended just after nine o’clock due to darkness. To that point, the players had completed four sets. Isner took the first set and, after losing sets two and three, evened the match by winning a fourth-set tie break.

The match resumed the following afternoon. After nearly four hours of play, the pair set a new record for the world’s longest professional tennis match. Mahut and Isner continued to battle for an additional four hours before play was once again called off due to darkness. At this point, the final set was knotted in a tie break at 59 games apiece.

As the match entered its historic third day, Mahut and Isner continued for more than an hour before the American secured the first break since day one, winning the match 70 games to 68 in the fifth set. The final set alone took 8 hours and 11 minutes, eclipsing the previous longest match ever played by more than an hour. In total, the match lasted 11 hours and 5 minutes. Additional records set during the match included 113 aces served by Isner and 103 by Mahut, the first- and second-most ever, and 84 consecutive service games held, a record both Isner and Mahut achieved over the course of the final three sets.